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First Language Lessons Level 1

5.00 out of 5
(6 customer reviews)

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  • Selected Options: $13.95
  • $11.86(Save 15%)

A complete grammar text for young students, First Language Lessons Level 1 uses copywork, narration, picture study, and other classical techniques to develop language ability. All you need is the teacher’s book and the lined paper of your choice. First- and second-graders should begin with Level 1.

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Memorize the parts of speech easily with catchy songs, and enjoy listening to the fun poems, entertaining stories, and memorable rhymes! The Audio Companion comes in CD or MP3 format, and is designed to accompany Levels 1 & 2.

Product Overview

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A complete grammar text for the youngest student, Level 1 uses copywork, narration, picture study, and other classical techniques to develop the student’s language ability. From nouns and verbs to punctuation and capitalization, these easy-to-use, scripted lessons will give your child a solid foundation in grammar and clear communication. This teacher book is all you need for this level – no workbook! Students write the copywork on the lined paper they prefer.

Because Level 2 assumes knowledge of the concepts taught in Level 1, students in both first and second grade should start with Level 1. Students who complete Level 1 in 1st grade should move on to Level 2 in 2nd grade; students who complete Level 1 in 2nd grade may move on to FLL 3.

Titles Available in this Bundle

First Language Lessons Level 1

A complete grammar text for young students, First Language Lessons Level 1 uses copywork, narration, picture study, and other classical techniques to develop language ability. All you need is the teacher’s book and the lined paper of your choice. First- and second-graders should begin with Level 1.

First Language Lessons, Audio Companion

Memorize the parts of speech easily with catchy songs, and enjoy listening to the fun poems, entertaining stories, and memorable rhymes! The Audio Companion comes in CD or MP3 format, and is designed to accompany Levels 1 & 2.

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5 out of 5 stars

6 reviews

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What others are saying

  1. One person found this helpful

    Question

    Sophie

    Hello,
    I am homeschooling a 7 year old in 2nd grade. We have been homeschooling since preschool, but we have just started learning grammar earlier this year, I have been using various resources, but nothing really consistant. We have also just started Writing with Ease level 1 (where she is able to keep up at the lower level of Level 1. She also does copy work and narrations for literature (2x week), science (1 every other week), and history (2x a week); but she gets tired of writing easily (mentally and physically). She knows what common nouns, proper nouns and action verbs are, and has little to no trouble with capitalization and basic punctuation, so I was thinking of starting FLL level 1 somewhere around chapter 44. My concern is that does seem like a lot of extra writing for her in addition to WWE and the additional writing in other subjects.. How would you suggest I implement FLL without overwhelming her? Also, the description mentions a teacher’s book, I dont see it on the site.

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    • One person found this helpful

      Answer Desk

      You only need the one book for FLL 1. The wording in the description is a bit confusing and I’ll see about clarifying it.

      FLL 1 is mostly oral, so I don’t think the amount of writing would overwhelm her. You can skip any of the exercises in FLL that are called “Story Narration” or “Poem Narration,” since she’ll be getting plenty of that in WWE.

      You might also consider dropping the literature narrations, as that’s essentially what she’s doing in WWE.

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  2. 5 out of 5
    Quick, easy, comprehensive

    Abigail Krieger

    These lessons are quick and easy but very comprehensive. I feel that this provides the perfect foundation for early writing.

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  3. Sandy

    How many lessons do you recommend completing a day for a 7 and 8 year old?

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  4. Adel

    How long do each of theses lessons take to complete?

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  5. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey Buhl

    Gentle introduction for the non-reader. Lessons took 5-10 min and my kids enjoyed them!

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  6. Question

    Leslie

    We are pulling our 9yo with ADHD from public school (4th grade currently) and starting homeschooling in Fall. District says he is below grade standard but i dont know how below. Should I start from book 1 and work up to book 4 to cover unknown knowledge gaps? I don’t want to waste time but I want to make sure he has the requisite knowledge base before entering “middle school” age.

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    • Answer Desk

      You should be able to start with Level 3, which reviews the prior material. Level 4 will do the same. If you do those two levels, he will be ready for Grammar for the Well-Trained Mind in 7th grade, which many students do (some start in high school because their school did not teach grammar).

      If he is highly averse to writing, you could go with Level 1 just to get a positive start, as Levels 1 & 2 are primarily oral (do not start with Level 2, it does not review Level 1 material). Most older students will go through these levels more quickly than usual, but there is no need to rush it. Mastery is the goal, and plenty of students are studying grammar in high school.

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  7. Question

    Rana

    What is the age I can begin lessons? Is it suitable for a 5 year old?

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    • One person found this helpful

      Answer Desk

      There is no need to start it in kindergarten, as students will have plenty of time to master elementary grammar if they start in first or second grade. For kindergarten language arts, we recommend focusing on phonics such as The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading, Revised Edition Instructor Book, a handwriting program, and of course reading lots of great books.

      Having said that, sometimes a 5-yr-old goes along for the ride with an older sibling, and that’s fine and practically unavoidable, or you have a student who really wants more. In those cases, be aware that Level 1 is mostly oral, but does have copywork beginning around Lesson 42, along with narration, poetry memorization, and other techniques. Should you decide to try it with a 5-year-old, be prepared to go slowly or put it away until next year if needed. It should not be a struggle.

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  8. Question

    Adelaide

    I have a 7 year old daughter and a 6 year old son entering grade 2 and grade 1, respectively. I am interested in using First Language Lessons to gently introduce them to grammar. I was hoping to simplify my homeschool day and combine the grammar lessons for both of them since they are starting out together (we have a 1 year-old, as well. Not doubling on subjects would be ideal). I’m just not sure if I should start with Level 1 or Level 2. Based on some of the following additional information, let me know what you would advise:

    My 7 year old daughter is a voracious reader and basically taught herself how to read by the time she was 4. Until very recently, however, she seemed to struggle to find the words to narrate back what she was reading. Again, this has recently improved, but the retelling skills and rich vocabulary use, despite all the reading, was slow coming. Her penmanship is quite neat with proper spacing and she copies written work with ease and can easily write multiple sentences, up to a short paragraph or poem with no complaints.
    My son is 6 and working steadily through a phonics program and can sound out most CVC words with general ease but does easily get frustrated with the time it takes to learn to read and sound out words. This might be because his mind and mouth race faster than his developmental level. His oral acquisition of vocabulary has always been stellar and he remembers what words mean after a quick definition and applies them correctly almost immediately. His vocabulary is very rich for a 6 year old. In terms of handwriting, his actual penmanship is getting neater but he still mixes up a few letters and gets very fidgety when doing handwriting exercises unless it’s for a purpose that motivates him (writing a birthday card, sending a secret message, writing his own story). A short 4-5 word sentence is probably his current limit before he wants to move on.
    I like the pacing of level 1 for my son and the fact that the copy work is very gentle. I think my daughter wouldn’t lose complete patience with level 1, but I do think she would be challenged more appropriately with level 2.

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    • Answer Desk

      This is an easy choice, because you have to start with Level 1, as Level 2 assumes prior knowledge (this is not true for Levels 3 and 4 for older students).

      I do think the inclusion of things like poetry memorization and picture study will help hold her interest, and the copy work is meant to be adjusted for the particular student. For example, the copy work for a certain poem offers three choices: copy the title, author, and first line; copy the title, author, and first two lines; copy the title, author, and first stanza. Those are the suggestions given for ease of use, and you could of course adjust it still further. The narration exercises will probably hit the sweet spot for her and offer some challenge.

      I’d probably recommend combining them even without a baby in the mix!

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  9. Question

    Paris

    We are new to homsechooling and are choosing curricula for our second grader. Does this curriculum need to be paired with Writing With Ease? Or does First Language Lessons 1 include the writing component of the language arts core. Thank you for your help.

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    • Answer Desk

      First Language Lessons includes the foundational writing skill of narration (putting ideas into words) and a limited amount of copywork (putting words down on paper) that you will also see in the beginning of Writing with Ease. For second grade, you might consider starting with just FLL 1, adding in more copywork and dictation as the student is able to handle it – just use sentences from anything you are currently reading in school. Then start with Writing with Ease Level 1 in third grade. That would have the student starting middle-school programs for writing and grammar, such as Writing with Skill and Grammar for the Well-Trained Mind, in sixth grade, which is a good fit for most students.

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  10. Question

    Paris

    Thank you for your response. Just to clarify, you would recommend starting Writing With Ease in third grade in place of First Language Lessons 2 or in addition to the First Language Lessons program. Thank you for your help.

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  11. Question

    Candace

    Hello, I have a kindergartner, 3/4th grader and a high school senior. I somehow just found out about this curriculum when I came across it at a book store. Can you help me to know where to start with the ages we have and how to progress through.

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    • Answer Desk

      We recommend that first and second grade students start with Level 1 (Level 2 assumes knowledge).

      Your 3rd/4th grader can start with Level 3.

      For middle and high school, please take a look at the program for older students, Grammar for the Well-Trained Mind.

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  12. Question

    Amanda

    Is this designed to do daily or 3 lessons a week? or one a week? What do you recommend?

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  13. Question

    Denise

    I have a 7th grader and a 4th grader. My 7th grader just finally got the hang of reading a couple years ago, so I am teaching both of my kids together. After 3/4 of the way through Fix It Grammar, neither one can tell me what a noun, verb, adverb, or adjective is (they just guess), so I’m looking to start over with your curriculum. Would I start them at level 1?

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    • Answer Desk

      You do not need to start with FLL Level 1. Fourth grade and up can start with FLL Level 4, which will review all prior material before introducing new topics.

      Your seventh-grader might be able to start with Grammar for the Well-Trained Mind. It is aimed at middle and high school, but starts at the very beginning (what is a noun?). If you go to the product pages for GftWTM, you can see samples – just look under the illustration of the product.

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  14. Question

    Jules

    I have trilingual English Greek and Italian 6 year old ,3 1/2 year old. We live in Greece. I do some work books with her and she’s bright she can read and find root words, change to present past ect. I was recommended your curriculum . Where should I start? Is this made for parents or schools?

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    • Answer Desk

      You should start with Level 1, as Level 2 assumes knowledge taught in Level 1. FLL is in use at schools but was originally designed for parents. There is a sample of each book on the product page, and that will give you the topics covered.

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  15. Question

    Emily

    Is there a way to get the pdf for the cover, too? I live outside of the US, so print options are not ideal. But when I went to print this to use in our homeschool, I was disappointed that it does not include the cover.

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  16. Question

    Natasha

    Hello! I am planning to use the “first language lessons” level 1 with my soon to be first grader. I would love to supplement writing. Can you please let me know if this book covers writing? Do you recommend supplementing with “writing with ease” level 1? Are both these books for first grade? I would love some clarity before purchasing. Thanks so much! Natasha

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  17. Question

    Tess Jones

    I have a daughter just finishing 2nd and this curriculum looks like a good fit for her. I am not sure which level to start first. She will technically be grade 3 in the fall but using more 2nd grade curriculum.

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    • Answer Desk

      If she struggles with the physical act of writing still, I’d start her with Level 1 (the first two levels are primarily oral, but you can’t start with Level 2 as it assumes knowledge of Level 1). Then, when she is finished with Level 2, you can guage whether it’s better to go with Level 3 or 4 at that point – both of those levels review prior material.

      If she’s okay with writing in general, you can go to Level 3, but I’d err on the side of Level 1 if you are unsure.

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