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The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading

5.00<2
5.00 out of 5 based on 2 customer ratings
(3 customer reviews)
$23.95$29.95
 

A plain-English guide to teaching phonics. Every parent can teach reading; no experts need apply!

Take charge of your child’s literacy with this jargon-free phonics guide. Too many parents watch their children struggle with early reading skills — and don’t know how to help. Many phonics programs are too often complicated, overpriced, gimmicky, and filled with obscure educationalese.

The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading cuts through the confusion, giving parents a simple, direct, scripted guide to teaching reading — from short vowels through supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading is user-friendly, affordable, and easy to follow — supplying you with everything you need to teach reading in one book. This program teaches all 72 phonograms, one at a time, and has built in review.

Clarification: we do NOT offer a guarantee that children who learn phonics from The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading will win the spelling bee. We only guarantee that they will grow up to be avid readers with fantastic grades who get into elite universities, then proceed to change the world with their creativity, erudition, and passion, while respecting rich and poor alike, and calling their parents at least twice a week with genuine gratitude and in-depth updates. 

That’s all. Just wanted to clarify that, so as not to raise unreasonable expectations.

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Product Description

A plain-English guide to teaching phonics. Every parent can teach reading; no experts need apply!

Take charge of your child’s literacy with this jargon-free phonics guide. Too many parents watch their children struggle with early reading skills — and don’t know how to help. Many phonics programs are too often complicated, overpriced, gimmicky, and filled with obscure educationalese.

The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading cuts through the confusion, giving parents a simple, direct, scripted guide to teaching reading — from short vowels through supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading is user-friendly, affordable, and easy to follow — supplying you with everything you need to teach reading in one book. This program teaches all 72 phonograms, one at a time, and has built in review.

Clarification: we do NOT offer a guarantee that children who learn phonics from The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading will win the spelling bee. We only guarantee that they will grow up to be avid readers with fantastic grades who get into elite universities, then proceed to change the world with their creativity, erudition, and passion, while respecting rich and poor alike, and calling their parents at least twice a week with genuine gratitude and in-depth updates. 

That’s all. Just wanted to clarify that, so as not to raise unreasonable expectations.

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What others are saying

  1. Question

    All of our children have learned to read using “The Ordinary Parent’s Guide.” It’s a wonderful resource! Our almost seven-year-old is about to complete the book, and I am again facing the happy “problem” that he’s now reading on a much higher level than his official grade level, which makes choosing the next reading curriculum a little tricky. In a large, busy family, the just-turn-the-page-and-do-the-next-lesson approach of the “Guide” is priceless. I’d love to have another reading resource that picks up/continues where the “Guide” leaves off, with further practice and reinforcement that’s easily broken down into daily lessons. What would you suggest for that? Any plans for some kind of sequel? 😉

  2. Question

    Is this a good book to use to supplement other programs? I have a program I’m using which I like, but my child still struggles with some areas and I’d like extra ideas. Would this be a good resource for picking up extra ideas from? Or would it be hard to use this non-sequentially?

    • This program is designed to be used sequentially, but it could be used to supplement another program as well, yes.

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  3. 5 out of 5 Lovely AND Excellent

    We appreciate this program so much; this is the best reading program we have found for a number of readings: the daily lessons are short and well-planned, the lessons are logically sequenced, the lessons are appropriately contextualized (none of that nonsense about memorizing sight words before one learns to read), and parents are given a great deal of support throughout the book. I love programs that empower parents and children to determine how learning takes place. You can start this program when your child is 4, 5, 6, or 7, even. You can learn a section at a time, taking breaks in between, or just keep on going, steadily, day by day. The activities are short, fun, and effective. Both of my boys love being able to play language games, jump on word cards, make silly sentences, and go on reading-based scavenger hunts (all of which are in this book). The price is more than fair for the value of what you actually receive from this book; the book can be used for one child after another, so that is an added money saver. I recommend this book to everyone who is looking for a reading program because all children will benefit, whether they have learning differences or are intellectually gifted.

  4. Question

    I am currently using this book very successfully with my 4yo son. The back of the book states that it is for use through fourth grade. I’m curious if you could give me any indication of which lesson roughly correlates with completion of each grade level. I know every child’s development is very different but any information you could give would be helpful for future planning. Also, do people typically continue using the book for several years? Thank you!

    • Hmmm. When the child successfully finishes using the OPG, he/she is reading on a 4th-grade level, but it doesn’t mean it would take four years to complete. First graders would probably take a year to a year and a half to complete the book. Someone starting at four years old, like your son, might finish by the time he’s 6. The book does not have exact pages/lessons that we can point to as the end of one grade and the beginning of another.
      You may find this information helpful:

      Readers: https://welltrainedmind.com/books-for-beginning-readers/

      FAQ: https://welltrainedmind.com/frequently-asked-questions-about-phonics-reading/
      As well as the introduction in the book itself.

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  5. 5 out of 5 Thorough - no other resource needed

    This book goes into each sound so well – I’ve considered bringing some lessons to my students in 11th grade in public school! I’ve had to learn how to move at the right pace for my kindergartener (even slower than 2 review, 1 new pace – we’ve repeated and repeated so many times!) but the stories have enough variety in content to keep him reading. We also do Bob books and other early readers from the library to supplement “lessons”.

  6. Question

    My child is begging 1st grade and although I never formally taught him to read he can read just about anything. Is it still important cover phonics?

    • Yes, we still recommend covering phonics. There are probably gaps/holes in the child’s reading knowledge that could hinder him later on as he encounters more complex words. You could skip (or move quickly through) the early lessons of O.P.G., where the student is mostly just learning letter sounds.

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  7. Question

    My child is going into second grade. This will be our first year of home school. She was using Abeka for phonics before. She is also an advanced reader. How do I know where to start with phonics? is there a pretest for instance?

    • There isn’t a pretest. But if you look at the Table of Contents on pages 363-368 of the Sample that’s available on that page, you can see what each lesson covers. It sounds like, given where she is, she could skip at least the first 100 lessons.

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  8. Question

    Would this be appropriate for almost-5 year olds? It says kindergarten, but I’m wondering if I could start my almost 5 year olds with it.

    • Yes, many 4-year-olds have used the program, and even some 3-year-olds. Teach by time at first, no more than ten minutes, and you can gradually increase.

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  9. Question

    I have 4, 6, and 8 year olds who I am considering homeschooling this year. I don’t know how much phonics the 8yo got in grade 1 and 2. The 6yo is just starting to be able to read a little. The 4yo can sing the alphabet song, but is not firm in his knowledge. Can your book be used to teach everyone? How do I figure out where the 8yo should start?

    • Yes, you could use this with all three children, provided that you are able to give each of them some one-on-one time for instruction & help. For the 8yo, if they have mastered the letter-sounds, consider skipping ahead at least to Lesson 41 or possibly to Lesson 54.

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  10. Question

    Is this program appropriate for a 4 year old who has diagnosed apraxia? I read in Well Trained Mind that the Orton-Gillingham method could be helpful for children with language disabilities, but I didn’t want to jump right to that. Any advice? Thanks.

    • I can’t speak to the apraxia specifically, but maybe these details will help you compare it to other programs. It teaches the 72 phonograms one at a time and has review. It uses explicit phonics: the basic sounds of letters are taught systematically and then blended into words. The words the child learns to read are put into meaningful sentences right away. It uses audio, visual, and tactile modes of learning: the child hears sounds and says words aloud, the child sees the letters in print and learns the sounds they represent, and the child is encouraged to handle letters for tactile experience. I hope that is helpful!

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  11. Question

    For those who loved this curriculum what do you recommend to transition to after completing this book?

    • Krystle, this list of Beginning Readers might be helpful.

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  12. Question

    My son just turned 5 and he has completed “How to Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons” and is doing wonderfully with reading on his own. Would this program be good to follow that program? He still has gaps in his knowledge since the book taught him the basics of reading by sounding things out, but he still struggles with properly pronouncing certain words that have different rules (silent e, etc).

    • Additional practice is always a good idea when skills haven’t been mastered, but he wouldn’t need to start at the very beginning of the book if he is fine with the basic sounds. Single consonant and short vowels go through Lesson 40, for example. There are 231 lessons, and if you click on the Sample button and scroll down to page 26 of the sample, you can see what is covered in each lesson.

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  13. Question

    I have friend who is step mom to a 10 year old who cannot read – would you recommend this book for an older child who is already in the public school system? Would they skip some of the earlier parts? Or is there another guide you would recommend?

    • One person found this helpful

      Yes, this program can be used (and has been successfully used) with children in similar situations. Depending on the child’s level of knowledge about the alphabet, you may be able to move rapidly through the earliest lessons. There is also a short section in the back of the book called “Remedial Reading With an Older Child,” which your friend should check out before she begins teaching the material.

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